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Congenital buckled spine

Neurological Disorders Resources. Treatment and care for pets having pain or trouble walking or standing due to spinal injuries or neurological disorders like IVDD, FCE and DM.
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CarolC
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

Post by CarolC »

I've been wondering about you, but figured you were busy with the new litters. It's not your fault if he didn't get a lot of wheelchair time.

When I wrecked my back I used up all the PT sessions my insurance would cover, but it still wasn't better, so I kept going out of pocket. At the time I also had 2 dogs going to canine PT twice a week so I was going broke, but I think the extra PT probably helped.

You got a good deal on that lift, I didn't know they had them for that price! If he's on the bed, it looks like it should be able to roll right under the bed and center over him. One thing with a lift is, when the load leaves the ground, it can sometimes spin or turn. You want to be sure he isn't going to whirl around and hit his face on the corner of the table or anything.

I hope you can get some more improvement in the shoulder. The things we take for granted.

Is he growing much more?
Milo's Mom
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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I changed my PT sessions from 3x week to 2x week and have a list of shoulder exercises I can do at home on the off days. Hopefully I can get it close enough to continue on my own until range of motion is closer to normal.

I originally found an Invacare model on Amazon that was only $314, but my husband kept putting off buying it and when I checked back it was $580. Found the Drive model and reviews were good, so saved up some puppy deposits and ordered it myself.

The Yorkies have a fenced area in the back yard that has chipped gravel, so we made a drag bag for Milo and took him out to the yard yesterday. He spent all day hopping from one side of the yard to the other, barking and sniffing at the Pyr puppies on the other side of the fence.

He's only gained a few pounds in the last two months, but he's longer and taller. We're getting a lot better at adjusting his wheelchair and harness; got it adjusted perfectly for his extra growth on the first attempt!
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CarolC
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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Milo's Mom wrote: Thu May 20, 2021 12:10 pm I changed my PT sessions from 3x week to 2x week and have a list of shoulder exercises I can do at home on the off days. Hopefully I can get it close enough to continue on my own until range of motion is closer to normal.

Probably a dumb question, but I assume it still hurts, at least to exercise. I am still shocked seeing the extent of the effects of this kind of injury. I'm glad you're working your way back from it and making improvement, but it's a very significant injury. It's shocking to think everything could be so perfectly fine one minute, and the world is turned on its head the next.

I've had 2 once-in-a-lifetime crises where I had to ask people for help (regarding change of work schedule both times) and they were not gracious (understatement) about it. I don't think people realize, when you are in the middle of a crisis, your mind locks in the memory in detail forever, and you always remember how that went.


I originally found an Invacare model on Amazon that was only $314, but my husband kept putting off buying it and when I checked back it was $580. Found the Drive model and reviews were good, so saved up some puppy deposits and ordered it myself.

Well, that was $75 which could have been saved. I hope this turns out to be a great lift. If you can possibly get a photo of it in action sometime, that could help other people see what kind of sling you worked out to make the human lift into a Milo Lift. :D If people can see it, they can copy it.

The Yorkies have a fenced area in the back yard that has chipped gravel, so we made a drag bag for Milo and took him out to the yard yesterday. He spent all day hopping from one side of the yard to the other, barking and sniffing at the Pyr puppies on the other side of the fence.

Bet he had so much fun.

He's only gained a few pounds in the last two months, but he's longer and taller.

Just curious, off the subject. Are you noticing anything with his mouth, such as crowded teeth (maybe it's too soon to tell) or a cathedral palate (high arched roof of his mouth)? Does his sternum seem normal?

We're getting a lot better at adjusting his wheelchair and harness; got it adjusted perfectly for his extra growth on the first attempt!

Good job! :trophy: I remember the day when wheelchairs were not adjustable when your puppy grew, and it wasn't that long ago! :wink:
Milo's Mom
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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For most day to day tasks, the range of motion I have is good enough and doesn't hurt much. Trying to lift a 40 lb bag of dog food, reaching overhead, or very far backward does hurt. It's not excruciating, but annoying. The break was so close to the shoulder joint that it's considered a shoulder injury. Keeping that arm in a sling and motionless while the bone healed meant the shoulder itself wasn't being used, so all the muscles and tendons in the shoulder joint tightened up and needs to be broken loose with repeated stretching exercises.

Other people's priorities often don't mesh with what we believe is most important. I'm just disappointed that these particular people didn't care about Milo's welfare though they live across the driveway and see him every day.

Haven't gotten the 80 lb box into the house yet to assemble the lift. Clear skies for the next few days so puppy pictures and deworming cows and calves moved up on the to-do list.

We had a cow give birth in the woods and her calf followed her up to the feeding trough at dinnertime. Two days later another calf is standing in the middle of the cows crying for mama and none of the cows would feed him. The mama had given birth to twins and only one followed her to the barn that night so she'd forgotten the second calf belonged to her. I managed to get a halter on him, push him all the way into the barn, and teach him how to drink from a bottle four times a day. My new little moo-son is named Solo. Guess my arms are working for the most important things like wrestling a calf and holding onto a half gallon baby bottle. :)

Milo's not showing any deformities other than the spine. His snout has grown to adult size and he has perfect teeth and palate. Sternum seems fine. Best of all he doesn't act like anything hurts at all.
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CarolC
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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Milo's Mom wrote: Thu May 20, 2021 8:15 pm For most day to day tasks, the range of motion I have is good enough and doesn't hurt much. Trying to lift a 40 lb bag of dog food, reaching overhead, or very far backward does hurt. It's not excruciating, but annoying. The break was so close to the shoulder joint that it's considered a shoulder injury. Keeping that arm in a sling and motionless while the bone healed meant the shoulder itself wasn't being used, so all the muscles and tendons in the shoulder joint tightened up and needs to be broken loose with repeated stretching exercises.

Good thing it wasn't immobilized longer than it was. I guess it got a bit frozen. I had to work for months on the ankylosis in my back that came from never bending for 8 months when I was lifting Merlin so much.

Other people's priorities often don't mesh with what we believe is most important. I'm just disappointed that these particular people didn't care about Milo's welfare though they live across the driveway and see him every day.

True about priorities and what's important. Family members do not always agree about care of a disabled pet. I almost asked, don't they care about him, but I decided not to. I wish everyone had the "caregiver gene". :)

Haven't gotten the 80 lb box into the house yet to assemble the lift. Clear skies for the next few days so puppy pictures and deworming cows and calves moved up on the to-do list.

When you have time, it might work to open the box on the tailgate and carry the parts in one piece at a time. Not sure how you will get the top on, but maybe it can be done one-handed.

We had a cow give birth in the woods and her calf followed her up to the feeding trough at dinnertime. Two days later another calf is standing in the middle of the cows crying for mama and none of the cows would feed him. The mama had given birth to twins and only one followed her to the barn that night so she'd forgotten the second calf belonged to her. I managed to get a halter on him, push him all the way into the barn, and teach him how to drink from a bottle four times a day. My new little moo-son is named Solo. Guess my arms are working for the most important things like wrestling a calf and holding onto a half gallon baby bottle. :)

"moo-son" :lol: Awww! That calf is your new rehab therapist. :wub:

Milo's not showing any deformities other than the spine. His snout has grown to adult size and he has perfect teeth and palate. Sternum seems fine. Best of all he doesn't act like anything hurts at all.

That is great. He sounds like a happy, growing boy. :D
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critters
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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Oh yeah, they're NICE!! :smart:
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CarolC
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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There is another puppy like Milo. His name is Benny. He's a goldendoodle. There's a really nice video where his foster talks about him. The rescue's specialist said no signals are getting through to his legs. That is not consistent with other dogs with a similar spinal deformity like sunspirit's pug Tucker, or Feef's Boston Terrier Finn, or your Great Pyrenees Milo. They could walk as pups.

Apparently Benny is being fostered at the Tucker Farm, which also has goats. :D

Benny_xray.PNG



https://blog.handicappedpets.com/paraly ... alkin-pets
Milo's Mom
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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I contacted her on Facebook and sent Milo's x-ray and wheelchair video. Offered to compare notes on Benny & Milo and to tell her how he's doing now at 10 months. Holy moley, I've had Milo 10 months! Time sure does fly.
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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That's great! I tried to contact the farm and sent a link to the posts, but I'm not on Facebook so I'm glad you did. :)
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Re: Congenital buckled spine

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Another GP puppy with deformity of her thoracic spine (who unfortunately also had a neck injury as a puppy). Petfinder calls her Pumpernickel but Big Dogs Huge Paws calls her Puppernickel :D and she is about a year old.

Puppernickel.jpg
https://www.petfinder.com

Pumpernickel Great Pyrenees Aurora, CO

Puppy Female Extra Large White / Cream

About

Health
Vaccinations up to date, special needs. posterior paralysis, uses wheelchair.

Good in a home with
Other dogs, children.

Meet Pumpernickel
Puppernickel is a 14 week old Great Pyrenees puppy that was unfortunately mauled by another dog at her property when she was only 3 weeks old. After a few weeks she was thankfully surrendered to a vet clinic and they reached out to us to help get her the proper care Puppernickel has seen a neurologist and while there is evidence of cervical spine trauma and remodeling, she also suffers from deformities of her thoracic spine and there is sadly no surgical intervention that will help her be able to walk again without a wheelchair. She is a very sweet girl who is good with everyone and everything that she meets. She tries her best to do all the things she wants to do and now she has her wheels she is enjoying being mobile once again!

Giant Breed Experienced Homes Only.

BDHPI Puppy Policy

All puppies less than 6 months of age are too young to be spayed/neutered so they are adopted out on special puppy spay/neuter agreements with a $50 refundable spay/neuter deposit. Adopting families must agree to get the puppy altered within 2 weeks of 6 months of age and send proof of S/N to BDHPI accordingly. Adopting families are expected to make a donation of $425 minimum for mixed puppies AND will have the additional costs listed above, so please keep this in mind.

When adopting a puppy, new families need to be prepared for not only a substantial financial investment, but also a significant time commitment in order to raise your puppy properly. Crate training is a critical part of setting them up for success as well as potty training. You can't leave a puppy in the crate for longer than 4 hours max and they typically have to be let outside every hour when you are home since their bladder is not as big as an adult. You will want to make sure your puppy gets regular exercise and has plenty of mentally stimulating chew toys such as puzzle toys(food cubes, busy buddy toys, kongs, etc). Socialization the first 6 months is critical to their development socially and once they have had all of their shots, you will want to take your new puppy everywhere you can to get them used to meeting lots of new people, different dogs, and visiting places outside of the home. Obedience training is also extremely important (and actually part of our adoption agreement requirements) so that your puppy grows up to be a gentle giant instead of a giant monster!

To see the most up to date adoption status of this dog, please visit www.bigdogshugepaws.com
This is just one of hundreds of gentle giants available for adoption at BDHPI! It is best not to get your heart set on any one particular dog upfront because there is no guarantee they will still be available once you are approved or that they are even the right match for your family. Purebred puppies are only eligible for adoption to giant breed experienced homes.
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